Robert Frost's Poem The Road Not Taken – Annotated Bibliography Example

Robert Frost’s poem “The Road not Taken” is often analyzed symbolically. The two roads described are the hard and easy paths an individual encountersduring life. More specifically, these two paths are a person’s whole life path. These two paths are chosen by a person’s characteristic or inner resolve. The two paths are symbols for not just one choice along the way, but all choices made.
The easy path in the poem was more desirable “because it was grassy and wanted wear” (Frost). This path represented a life with no challenges, dangers, or obstacles. An individual whose character was weaker would take the easy path to reach their destination, since these weaker individuals knew the harder path would be impossible for them. The easier path was also faster, since no overgrowth littered the way. A determined person might want to take this path in order to reach their goals faster. An individual that did not want challenges, dangers, or obstacles would take the easier path.
The hard path was a harder path. This path was described as “bent in the undergrowth” (Frost). An individual that takes this path would like challenges, danger, and obstacles. People that take this path would be stubborn and relentless to achieve their goals. Individuals that choose this path must have a strong character in order to complete the journey. An individual that wanted to face the challenges, dangers, and obstacles would choose this path.
In Frost’s journey, he chose the harder path. By taking the less traveled path, Frost’s character was shown as tough. He expressed that by taking the harder path “has made all the difference” (Frost). This difference could mean that Frost’s character was improved by this path. However, it could also mean that Frost enjoyed the journey. Both paths come to the same end. Frost enjoyed the path that added to his character and made him a better person. It is not the end result, but the journey that matters the most.    
Bibliography
Frost, Robert. “The Road not Taken.”