CDC Wonder Data – Case Study Example

A Comparison of Death Statistics of Texas and New York Using CDC Wonder Data Special Focus to Firearms [You can change the of [Enter Your Name]
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I used CDC compressed mortality data to compare the crude death rate for the year 2005 of males of the states of New York and Texas. The data I obtained is tabulated below:
State
Year
Gender
Deaths
Population
Death rate/100,000
Texas
2005
Male
79,197
11,385,616
695.6
New York
2005
Male
71,959
9,328,547
771.4
Table 1: Taken from CDC Wonder Data, Copyrights 2005
As indicated, the death rate for New York was 10.9% more than Texas for males in 2005.
Further, I chose the mode “Firearms” from the heading “Injury Mechanisms & All Other Leading Causes”. I chose that option because firearms cause 1.2% of all deaths in the US, thus it is a leading cause of deaths in the country, and an important analysis parameter (National Vital Statistics Report, 2002). The results we obtained through that have been tabulated below:
State
Year
Gender
Injury Mechanism
Deaths
Population
Death rate/100,000
Texas
2005
Male
Firearms
2,098
11,385,616
18.4
New York
2005
Male
Firearms
919
9,328,547
9.9
Table 2: Taken from CDC Wonder Data, Copyrights 2005
This data shows that the death rate due to firearms in Texas was 86% higher than New York, even though the net death rate in New York was more than Texas.
To analyze the reasons for this, we looked deeper into the causes of injury, by selecting “All Causes of Death” under the heading “Injury Intent” and found that suicides amass to 56% and 46% firearms deaths, and homicide deaths add up to 40% and 49% firearms related deaths for males in Texas and New York, respectively (CDC Wonder, 2005).
To analyze the reasons for such deaths further, we observed that the number of suicides in Texas has always been twice that of New York (suicide.org, 2005). Also, more than 50% of the suicides are firearms related (suicide.org, 2005). This indicates that the firearms deaths in Texas should be at least twice as much as such deaths in New York.
The major factors that contribute to this are the economy and social history of the two lands. The per capita income in New York was 25% more than that of Texas, for 2005 (BEA, 2005). This indicates a relatively stable economic situation in New York as compared to Texas. Economic situations are the biggest factor in pushing people towards suicide, so from the mentioned trend might be contributing to more suicides in Texas than in New York.
Furthermore, Texas is very rich in resources. There are a lot of mines, and industries; more than New York. Thus Texas hosts a larger labor force, and a larger economic gradient between the upper and lower classes. This leads to a high suicide rate in the poor lower class.
Coming to homicides, Texas has almost double the homicides’ rate of New York. This can be attributed to two major reasons:
1. According to crime rate statistics, Texas had the 7th highest crime rate index and 17th highest murder index as compared to 46th and 29th ranked New York (Disaster Center, 2005). Thus there is a higher probability of homicides in Texas than New York.
2. Texas has a reputation as the land of cowboys and gun packing, which raises the probability of homicides in that state, as compared to New York.
The above mentioned points highlight the reasons for the trends of firearms related deaths in Texas and New York. One thing we should all realize is that firearms deaths are all unnatural, and the dying people are a huge loss to the society. Thus, as I analyze all these factors contributing to these deaths, I feel that there is a need to highlight the economic and criminal situation, to try to prevent these unnecessary and unnatural deaths.
References
BEA Regional Economic Accounts. (2005). State Annual Personal Income. Retrieved from http://www.bea.gov/regional/spi/default.cfm?selTable=SA30
CDC Wonder. (2005). Compressed Mortality1999-2006. Retrieved from http://wonder.cdc.gov/cmf-icd10.html
Disaster Center. (2005). New York Crime Rates 1960-2009 and Texas Crime Rates 1960-2009. Retrieved from http://www.disastercenter.com/crime/nycrime.htm and http://www.disastercenter.com/crime/txcrime.htm
National Vital Statistics Report. (2005). Leading Causes of Death in the United States. Retrieved from http://www.the-eggman.com/writings/death_stats.html
Suicide.org. (2005). Suicide Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.suicide.org/suicide-statistics.html